DEAR COLLEGE: I ALREADY SOLD YOU MY SOUL, I HAVE NOTHING LEFT TO GIVE YOU

I miss college. All of the social activities, sporting events, parties, friendships, constant eating, freedom, and the general lack of real responsibilities. It was a great time. Sure, occasionally there were unfortunate obligations like class and exams and homework, but for the most part it was awesome. What I don’t miss is the amount of bills that I knew, but didn’t really know, I was racking up. That should really be part of the high school curriculum – financial planning. What are loans? What is debt? What are bills? What does the health insurance paperwork mean? How do you file taxes? So many actually helpful things that could be taught.

Because now I have these monthly payments that are no fun at all to make. They most certainly are not awesome or a great time. So many other things I would like to do with that part of my paycheck, like travel, shop, drink, eat, have an experience, donate to charity, etc. Literally anything other than paying back the school that gave me a piece of paper. Go to college, they said. It’ll be fun, they said. You’ll get an education, they said. This way you can get a job, they said. It’s going to cost you everything, they didn’t say. Did I go? Yes. Was it fun? Most of the time. Did I get an education? Yes, but not the kind they probably had in mind. Was it the magic door to getting a job? Haha, absolutely not. Did selling my organs on the black market cover the cost? No, no – it was way more.

So, in other words, I spent all this money to get a job in the field that someone printed on a piece of paper. Some call it a diploma, but I would think that to be considered a big, fancy diploma, then they could have at least printed it on glossy paper. I mean, at this point, you can just add an extra $10 or so to my bill. I won’t even know. Ironically, what I do now could not be further from my field of study. And I’m not the only one. At some point, I was informed that employers care more about seeing that you can finish something. I feel like there are a lot of cheaper ways to do this…but clearly I’m in the minority on this one.

All of this is annoying, and frustrating, but in hindsight, I should have expected it when they asked me to pay a registration deposit and give them rights to my first-born child to attend. Alright, fine, that’s on me and my teenage innocence. What I’m not a fan of, nope too passive…what I absolutely loathe, is when they have the audacity to call me and ask for a donation. I’m sorry, I know you have my records still because you always seem to find my new address to spam with letters. So you would know that I am paying you. Still. From all those years ago when I actually was there. I’m what one would call, a mandatory donor. I wouldn’t say I have a giving spirit towards my alma mater, but more of an, I’d like to maintain a respectable credit score and not get audited type of spirit.

It would make slightly more sense if you asked me for money after I finished paying off my loans. Then, at least, I would be contributing nothing on a monthly basis so it would make sense that I might want to keep that bleeding train of dolla, dolla bills going. Because an object in motion tends to stay in motion. Honestly, the things I plan on doing with all that extra cash each month is not nearly as generous or productive as donating to support the education system. Might as well keep on giving. But now you’ve pissed me off. We both know that if I could afford to donate, I would have paid off my loans. Or simply chosen to pay for school upfront. Either way, I should not be the target demographic for the donor office student cold-callers.

Let’s take a quick second to break down why I’ve been a donor for so long:

  • Air is free everywhere in the world…except on college campuses
  • Meals can be relatively affordable, depending on your choices, everywhere in the world…except on college campuses
  • Learning is free, or reasonably priced (unless you’re in private school, but if that’s the case, this post is not for you)…except on college campuses
  • Nature is free to enjoy everywhere in the world…except on college campuses
  • Sports are free to watch (as long as your friends with someone who pays) everywhere in the world…except on college campuses
  • Hobbies vary in price, but can be pretty cheap, everywhere in the world…except on college campuses
  • Exercise can be affordable everywhere in the world…except on college campuses
  • Reading can be affordable everywhere in the world…except on college campuses

Seems like there’s the issue. You want to wake up today? $427 fee. You want to eat lunch? $28.37 fee. You want to walk on our sidewalks everyday? $13,078 fee. You want to buy books? $5,396 fee. You sneezed? $4.76 fee. You want to submit an assignment on our Wi-Fi and use our mandatory online portal? $28,340 fee. So, to answer your question, do I want to donate today? Bye, Felicia!

Alright, jumping off my pedestal for now. If you know someone who would enjoy this and want to share it with them, that would seriously mean a lot to me. I’m so grateful to all the current readers and subscribers. If you want to get these in your inbox twice weekly don’t forget to subscribe. Thanks for reading!


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I’M NOT A HOARDER, I’M SENTIMENTAL

You know how the saying goes: the more space you have, the more space you’ll fill up. I think that’s how it goes…but now that I’m thinking about it there’s a good chance I made it up. The concept is what’s really important here though – that being that you will “grow” into whatever extra space you have. Why is that? Seems like a very first-world problem where we have this need to fill the emptiness in our lives with something.

That just got way, way, way too deep for this blog so I’m going to take a massive step back into borderline nonsense territory before I scare some readers away. Anyways, back in the comfort of the half-joking, half-serious, and fully sarcastic world that I live in, I have noticed that I do tend to fill every last inch of space that is in the place where I’m living, or working, or eating lunch, or being chauffeured around in, or anywhere really that I ever am (regardless of whether or not I own said space). 

Extra shelf in the linen closet? Seems like the perfect place to store all the exercise equipment I’m not using. Extra drawer in the kitchen? Obviously I should put whiteboard markers in there just in case I ever buy a whiteboard for my fridge. Extra space on my desk? Seems like a good day to take an “extended lunch break” and see what goodies lie in the Amazon universe of office accessories. Extra seat next to me in the Uber? Clearly meant to put my backpack, coat, water bottle, keys, cell phone, lunchbox, and camera on (because putting them in the backpack would be ridiculous).

Can you relate? Duh – who doesn’t?! Why do you think tiny houses are so popular right now? The less space, then, by default, the less stuff you are allowed to have. Nothing like cutting out 95% of your square footage to force a serious spring cleaning. I mean, that is the only purpose of those houses right? Because who would willingly just live in that tiny of a space where the bathroom and the bedroom don’t only share a wall, they are one and the same. Be honest with yourselves for a second…every once in a while something tears right through your digestive system and leaves a very unpleasant output. Nobody’s trying to have that literally hanging in the air when trying to sleep, or eat.

So, for all the regular house living people in the world, who else has trouble getting rid of things? No need to raise your hand, I can’t see you. Just have that thought to yourself and know that you and I have at least one thing in common. Now, it’s not for a lack of trying, I have to say. I attempt to get rid of things (like random grocery store receipts, and instructions to appliances that I no longer own, or clothing that I bought in high school and it really should have stayed in high school) at least once every few months. The best motivation is right after I go through and online shopping spree and realize that there isn’t enough room for everyone at the party and I’ll be darned if my brand new friends get kicked out.

If you’re anything like me, then you go through everything you own and have excuses for simply throwing away the bare minimum amount of items. Thoughts like these dance through your head (because rule number one rule of having to throw away your “precious” is to have some killer dance music playing):

  • I don’t own a Mr. Coffee pot anymore, but what if I decide to buy one again someday (if all the Keurigs turn into robots and run away) and it DOESN’T come with instructions?!
  • I haven’t worn XS shirts since I was 5, but what if I lose all the weight on my body and become just a walking skeleton?! I would need this shirt
  • I don’t need 4 different backpacks, but what if three of them all break in some fashion?! I would need the fourth one as a back-back-backup
  • I haven’t shopped at this store in years, but what if I can still go online and get the $5 off coupon?!

Inevitably, then, nothing goes away as all of our incredibly logic thoughts convince us to keep them *just* *in* *case*. Does that make us hoarders? No, I like to believe it simply makes us sentimental. Besides, there’s always room under the bed, and in some closet/cabinet to store things, right?! If not, you aren’t shoving hard enough.

Alright, jumping off my pedestal for now. If you know someone who has a hard time parting with their belongings, share this post so we can trade war stories of being knee deep in socks and still trying to carefully find a place to put the newest few pairs. Thanks for reading!


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